Optimal Healing: A Guide to Traditional Chinese Medicine

Optimal Healing: A Guide to Traditional Chinese Medicine

Patricia Tsang MD

Language: English

Pages: 272

ISBN: 0979948495

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Reflecting training and experience in both Eastern and Western medicine, this reference uses a scientific perspective to shed light on the teaching and practices of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). In addition to examining the TCM approach to wellness and disease, the resource compares TCM to conventional Western approaches and shows the optimal way to integrate the two disciplines. A user-friendly survey includes a look into the meaning of liver fire, hot qi, and wet heat; offers advice on common complaints, among them how to avoid having bronchitis every winter, how to become asthma-free, and finding relief from back pain without drugs; provides answers to infertility that won’t break the bank; and addresses appropriate food choices for the individual.

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improving blood flow to various glands. Liver , Spleen , Kidney , and Lung Dr. Lai often said, “For lung diseases, we have to calm the Liver to stop it from attacking the Spleen, as well as support the Spleen and Kidney to treat the Lung .” It was only when I used the TCM meaning of these various organs that I could understand his algorithm. When we are emotionally stressed, our sympathetic system, the TCM Liver, is overactive. This overactive Liver, or sympathetic system, suppresses our

recovering from surgery or other medical conditions that deplete energy. Other meats in this category are lamb, beef, and venison. Wet-Hot Foods Mothers generally warn their children against eating too much candy or ice cream. Chinese mothers have an additional warning for their children—avoid too much Wet-Hot foods. I used to puzzle over why my mother warned me not to eat too many mangoes. This fruit is widely known among Chinese to be in the Wet-Hot category. I finally understood the

such as blood or sputum, cultures it to identify the offending microorganism, and runs further tests to determine which antimicrobials are the most effective in killing the microorganism. The perceived need for specificity permeates Western thinking among both doctors and patients. Sometimes it is carried to extremes. The assumption is that until the diagnosis is completely clarified with minute testing, treatment cannot be determined. When patients do not improve, they often ask for more tests

awakened, and have fitful sleep or a lot of dreams. Sleep disturbance occurs when there is heightened sympathetic activity. If liver Qi is deficient, the patient is easily frightened or angry. The emotional link also fits the fight or flight mechanism. A lot of liver Qi illness occurs in America certainly fit. Just look at the American phenomenon of road rage. Headache, dizziness, and possible stroke can all result from high blood pressure when there is excessive sympathetic or adrenergic

clearing heat and cleansing toxin herbs for, 121 viruses as Heat toxins, 120–122 Water, elemental, 48–49 Wei Qi Cold and, 40–41 immune system as, 28 meaning of, 28–29 Wei Qi, Internal Entity and, 65 weight control drugs for, 197 misuse of herbs for, 205 See also obesity. Wet (Evil) food choice and, 161 disease correlates of, 43–44 wet-hot foods, 160–161 Wind (Evil) disease correlates of, 44–46 Wind Wet as arthritis, 46, 161 wiry pulse, 71 women’s health, TCM and, 104–106

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