The King of Madison Avenue: David Ogilvy and the Making of Modern Advertising

The King of Madison Avenue: David Ogilvy and the Making of Modern Advertising

Kenneth Roman

Language: English

Pages: 304

ISBN: 0230100368

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Famous for his colorful personality and formidable intellect, David Ogilvy left an indelible mark on the advertising world, transforming it from a disreputable business into a dynamic industry full of passionate, creative individuals. This biography is based on a wealth of material from the author's decades of working alongside the advertising giant, including a large collection of photos, memos, recordings, notes, and extensive archives of Ogilvy's personal papers.
This biography is based on a wealth of material from decades of working alongside the advertising giant, including a large collection of photos, memos, recordings, notes, and extensive archives of Ogilvy's personal papers. The book describes the creation of some of history's most famous advertising campaigns, such as:

* "The man in the Hathaway shirt" with his aristocratic eye patch
* "The man from Schweppes is here" with Commander Whitehead, the elegant bearded Brit, introducing tonic water (and "Schweppervesence") to the U.S.
* Perhaps the most famous automobile headline of all time--"At 60 miles an hour the loudest noise in this new Rolls-Royce comes from the electric clock."
* "Pablo Casals is coming home--to Puerto Rico." Ogilvy said this campaign, which helped change the image of a country, was his proudest achievement.
* And his greatest (if less recognized) sales success--"DOVE creams your skin while you wash."

Fifty years later, still on his original proposition that it doesn't dry your skin, Dove has become the largest selling cleansing brand in the world.

Roman also carries Ogilvy's message into the present day, showing the contemporary relevance of the bottom-line focus for which his business ventures are remembered, and how this approach is still key for professionals in the modern advertising world.

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take heart! There is no correlation between success at school and success in life. Invited back in 1974, he offered an inventive litany of ideas to develop a unique image for the school: hire a great French chef; train students to be first-class plumbers, carpenters, electricians, painters, and gardeners; hire a dancing master so boys would be able to dance with the boss’s wife; teach typing and shorthand (he could do neither); make attendance at classes optional and make the boys pay to enter

who were more interesting than the movie stars,” said Ogilvy. And it was he, not Gallup, who was dealing with them. “There was I, going to Hollywood all the time, and dealing with big shots like David Selznick and Sam Goldwyn. I was dealing with them. I had meetings with them, alone! I was on the telephone with them all the time. For that Gallup was paying me 40 bucks a week!” Ogilvy saw himself as a champion of viewers he felt were overlooked. The motion picture audience is broader-based than

Muñoz-Marín, the governor of Puerto Rico, and his economic ally Teodoro “Teddy” Moscoso told him that unemployment and poverty in their country were appalling, and they desperately needed industry. They had been working to improve conditions in the country; it was Ogilvy’s task to relay that news accurately to the American public, especially for manufacturers. Viewing the mission as a higher calling, Ogilvy threw himself into portraying Puerto Rico as “an island in renaissance.” He complained he

left a totally false impression regarding our communications. Ads were prepared, with headlines like “Hostile to our clients, hostile to our employees, hostile to all we stand for.” Ogilvy suggested side-by-side photos of Sorrell and himself. Under Sorrell’s, a quote: “ . . . the most despised man on Madison Avenue.” Under his: “The most sought-after wizard in American advertising.” Advertising wasn’t going to be the answer to hard financial facts. None of the proposed ads ran. Over the next 18

half-brother Kenneth of the Battle, who once felt himself to have been insulted by his wife’s cousin. Kenneth decided to return insult with insult by returning his wife (who had only one eye) to her family. He sent her back on a one-eyed pony, accompanied by a one-eyed servant, and followed by a one-eyed dog, naturally provoking some carnage. Ogilvy, who described himself as a “perfervid” Mackenzie, persuaded his equally ardent sister Christina to publish the memoirs of their other Scottish

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