The Marx Brothers (Pocket Essential series)

The Marx Brothers (Pocket Essential series)

Language: English

Pages: 97

ISBN: B008AJ295M

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Wise-cracking Groucho Marx with his trademark cigar and painted on black moustache. Blonde, curly-wigged, mute Harpo, beeping his blub horn and chasing pretty girls. Rubber-faced Chico, twisting phrases into hysterical malapropisms. And handsome straight-man Zeppo Marx. Who can forget their antics in such classic comedy films as The Cocoanuts (1929), Animal Crackers (1930), Monkey Business (1931), Horse Feathers (1932), and Duck Soup (1933), which literally defined the cinematic term 1930's screwball comedy. After their first five movies became box-office hits, The Marx Brothers were bona fide movie stars. However, once they moved out to Hollywood, their film career seemed to stall. That was until Chico asked for help from one of his poker playing buddies, MGM head Irving Thalberg. Taken under Thalberg's wing, the brothers--now trimmed down to the trio of Groucho, Harpo and Chico--began the second stage of their film career. While at MGM, the kooky Marx trio reached new heights with their films including A Night At The Opera (1935), A Day At The Races (1937), Room Service (1938), At The Circus (1939), Go West (1940), The Big Store (1941), and A Night In Casablanca (1946). After World War II ended, movie tastes changed, and The Marx Brothers each went their separate ways. In 1949 however, they reunited for their final film together, Love Happy, which included a now-famous scene between Groucho and a struggling newcomer who called herself Marilyn Monroe. The Pocket Essential Marx Brothers includes a concise look at the incredible career of this unforgettable troupe, from their beginnings on the vaudeville circuit, to becoming Broadway stars, to their classic film stardom. All of the films, the co-stars, the plotlines, and all of the background tales are included. Also, the end of the film careers of the brothers is only part of the story, as Groucho, Harpo and Chico all branched out into other areas of the business on both radio and television.Wise-cracking Groucho Marx with his trademark cigar and painted on black moustache. Blonde, curly-wigged, mute Harpo, beeping his blub horn and chasing pretty girls. Rubber-faced Chico, twisting phrases into hysterical malapropisms. And handsome straight-man Zeppo Marx. Who can forget their antics in such classic comedy films as The Cocoanuts (1929), Animal Crackers (1930), Monkey Business (1931), Horse Feathers (1932), and Duck Soup (1933), which literally defined the cinematic term 1930's screwball comedy. After their first five movies became box-office hits, The Marx Brothers were bona fide movie stars. However, once they moved out to Hollywood, their film career seemed to stall. That was until Chico asked for help from one of his poker playing buddies, MGM head Irving Thalberg. Taken under Thalberg's wing, the brothers--now trimmed down to the trio of Groucho, Harpo and Chico--began the second stage of their film career. While at MGM, the kooky Marx trio reached new heights with their films including A Night At The Opera (1935), A Day At The Races (1937), Room Service (1938), At The Circus (1939), Go West (1940), The Big Store (1941), and A Night In Casablanca (1946). After World War II ended, movie tastes changed, and The Marx Brothers each went their separate ways. In 1949 however, they reunited for their final film together, Love Happy, which included a now-famous scene between Groucho and a struggling newcomer who called herself Marilyn Monroe. The Pocket Essential Marx Brothers includes a concise look at the incredible career of this unforgettable troupe, from their beginnings on the vaudeville circuit, to becoming Broadway stars, to their classic film stardom. All of the films, the co-stars, the plotlines, and all of the background tales are included. Also, the end of the film careers of the brothers is only part of the story, as Groucho, Harpo and Chico all branched out into other areas of the business on both radio and television.

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even offered to pay a small rental, but the managers seemed to be too considerate of their audiences. It was Chico - it’s always Chico - who found a weakwilled exhibitor in the Bronx who was willing to let us show our picture in the afternoon, when the audience consisted of backward children.’ (9) Needless to say, Humour Risk proved to be a financial risk for anyone involved in it. For the time being it was to languish gathering dust. From September 1922 to March 1923, The Four Marx Brothers

other two Nightingales, the Marx boys were clad in little sailor suits which Mama Minnie found on sale at Bloomingdale’s Department Store. By mid-1907, Minnie Marx had swept in to begin managing The Nightingales. With Ned Wayburn’s publicity machinery, and top theatrical bookings, The Nightingales were gaining popularity. In the November 30, 1906 issue of Variety, they were heralded for one such appearance with the billing: ‘The Three Nightingales, big hit Everywhere - Minnie Marx, manager.’ (6)

Bernstein & Company. However there was - as the old circus/showbiz adage goes - still saw21 dust running through his veins. With teenage friend Arthur Gordon, Chico started a new act. Having become adept at imitating the Italian accent of his barber, Chico and Arthur decided to lampoon Italian immigrants in their act, Gordoni & Marx. The act the duo put together paid their bills, and what was left over Chico gambled away. Even at the early age of 21, an unfortunate pattern had been set:

dropped out of the act before fame finally struck. Finally, after years of struggling, The Marx Brothers arrived when I’ll Say She Is became the surprise Broadway hit of 1924. Suddenly they were on a hot streak. They quickly followed it with The Cocoanuts, which ran from October 1925 to November 1927, and then Animal Crackers in October 1928. In 1929, when motion pictures with sound were suddenly all the rage and set to revolutionise the film business, studios were 7 scrambling to find actors

peace was declared, Gummo Marx enlisted in the army! Gummo had long been discontented with his life on the stage. Now that The Marx Brothers’ act was becoming less and less a song and dance act, and more and more a straight play with comic routines, Gummo was growing increasingly restless to get on with his own life. He saw enlisting in the army as the perfect way to leave the act behind him. With Gummo out of The Marx Brothers, Zeppo was suddenly in. Although Minnie was still very much in the

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